Rhizospheric Pseudomonas fluorescens enhances piperine production in Piper nigrum, a possible means of biochemical defence against Phytophthora capsici

Paul, Diby and Sarma, Y.R. (2005) Rhizospheric Pseudomonas fluorescens enhances piperine production in Piper nigrum, a possible means of biochemical defence against Phytophthora capsici. Archives of Phytopathology and Plant Protection, 39 (1). pp. 33-37.

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Abstract

Black pepper is an important export-oriented spice crop. Foot rot caused by P. capsici is a very serious disease, which cause serious economic loss to the farmers. Biological control is the viable strategy for sustainable disease management. Efficient strains of P. fluorescens reduced the foliar infection caused by P. capsici significantly. It has been observed that the level of piperine, the pungent principle in black pepper, is increased to significant levels upon root bacterization of the black pepper vines. In addition to it, piperine (Sigma) inhibited the mycelial growth of P. capsici, in vitro, demonstrating the direct fungicidal activity of this alkaloid. An increase in the quantity of piperine is supposed to contribute to the overall host defence mechanism of the plant. The paper describes for the first time, the rhizobacteria mediated induction of piperine in black pepper.

EPrint Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:Pseudomonas fluorescens, Piperine, Piper nigrum, Phytophthora capsici, Black Pepper, Host Defense, Foot rot
Subjects:Plants > Plant Families and Groups > Angiosperms > Piperaceae
Organic Chemicals > Lactones > Macrolides
Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins > Proteins > Plant Proteins
Food and Beverages > Food > Condiments > Spices > Black Pepper
Heterocyclic Compounds > Heterocyclic Compounds, 1-Ring > Piperidines
Animal Diseases > Foot Rot
Bacteria > Gram-Negative Bacteria > Gram-Negative Aerobic Bacteria > Gram-Negative Aerobic Rods and Cocci > Pseudomonadaceae > Pseudomonas
ID Code:2084
Deposited By:Dr Diby Paul
Deposited On:20 April 2007

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